fadedandblurred

fadedandblurred:

I would imagine that many, if not most, photographers would be reluctant to take their prized gear out in the rain, unless it was absolutely necessary to get the shot. I know I would be. But, snowy days and rainy nights are the conditions of choice for Paris-based photographer Christophe Jacrot, who specializes in street photography under “less than favorable” conditions. His Paris photographs show a completely different perspective on the City of Lights, and his photographs of Hong Kong look like something straight out of Bladerunner. His photographs are a brilliant union of keen aesthetics and impeccable timing, while also an exercise in remarkable patience, waiting for those decisive moments to happen. Jacrot says, “In my opinion, there are two ways of capturing the world for a photographer; on the one hand grasping its horror, and on the other sublimating it. I have chosen the second. More specifically, I like the way rain, snow and “bad weather” awaken a feeling of romantic fiction within me.”

Wow.

Ship on the Columbia, a new post at my photoblog, The Occasional Odd Crop
This is the cargo vessel Hao Ying, on the Columbia River off Astoria, Oregon.
The Columbia is my favorite body of water. The Pacific Ocean,  about 20 minutes from my house in San Diego, is fantastic, but I like  the Columbia for the shipping traffic. And you can see the other side, which makes it more interesting photographically.
I do not miss Astoria’s winter weather, of which I got a reminder  over my Christmas break, when I went back to visit my sons and their  kids. Forty-one degrees and rain. No thanks. But having that river  nearby would make up for the chill.

Ship on the Columbia, a new post at my photoblog, The Occasional Odd Crop

This is the cargo vessel Hao Ying, on the Columbia River off Astoria, Oregon.

The Columbia is my favorite body of water. The Pacific Ocean, about 20 minutes from my house in San Diego, is fantastic, but I like the Columbia for the shipping traffic. And you can see the other side, which makes it more interesting photographically.

I do not miss Astoria’s winter weather, of which I got a reminder over my Christmas break, when I went back to visit my sons and their kids. Forty-one degrees and rain. No thanks. But having that river nearby would make up for the chill.

memory-hole

I realize it’s a cliché to complain about the heat every damn summer, but COME ON!

robot-heart:

thecranium:

It’s still 55 degrees and raining in Portland.

Fuck you all.

Portland is one of my favorite places in the world, and on a nice day, Portland is glorious like no place I’ve ever been — not even San Diego, where I live now. But yeah, r-h, I get it. I remember a lot of 38-and-raining days in Portland, too. Miserable.

The usual, with a twist

When I leave work, one particular security guard is usually behind the desk at the door, and we usually exchange the same pleasantries:

Security guard: G’night.

Me: See ya.

Security guard: Take care.

Me: You too.

And I walk to my car.

It’s not quite “The Lord be with you” / “And also with you,” but it has some of the same flavor. We both know our lines, and we both know what’s coming next.

As I headed for the parking lot last night, there he was. But the weather had changed.

Security guard: G’night.

Me: See ya.

Security guard: It’s raining.

Me (laughing): I see that. G’night.

And I put up my hood and walked to my car.

newsweek

Not only that, but San Diego is having one of its coldest summers on record. The result? In some places, business is down, and people are actually complaining that our beautiful weather isn’t beautiful enough. Unbelievable.

 newsweek:

Today in scary reality:

Deadly mudslides in China, devastating floods in Pakistan, record-breaking heat and raging wildfires in Russia: it all adds up to a season of extremes. With global temperatures rising, is the worst yet to come?