photographersdirectory
photographersdirectory:

Working on my identity as a photographer. Love how photography can make seconds eternal. For now, I’m exploring the world with terrible cameras and feeding my creativity. Working mostly with phone cameras made me more aware of all the possibilities to convey that magic aura of the everyday things around me with the minimal gear (meaning I used magnifiers in front of the iphone lens for “macro” and so on, and I love this). However, soon will upgrade to bigger resolutions, smaller pixels and lots of joy. 

Reblogging because of “exploring the world with terrible cameras.” Nice turn of phrase.

photographersdirectory:

Working on my identity as a photographer. Love how photography can make seconds eternal. 

For now, I’m exploring the world with terrible cameras and feeding my creativity. Working mostly with phone cameras made me more aware of all the possibilities to convey that magic aura of the everyday things around me with the minimal gear (meaning I used magnifiers in front of the iphone lens for “macro” and so on, and I love this). However, soon will upgrade to bigger resolutions, smaller pixels and lots of joy. 

Reblogging because of “exploring the world with terrible cameras.” Nice turn of phrase.

dweller-in-the-meadow
eupraxsophy:

Some scientists suspect that Vincent van Gogh was autistic, and this painting, Starry Night, is one reason. The swirling and stormy skies you see here (as well as in his other paintings) seem to fit the precise mathematical formula for turbulence known as the Kolmogorov scaling - which was devised 50 years after the painter’s death.
Autistic individuals are known to naturally grasp such concepts in lieu of verbal and social interactions (which van Gogh was known for lacking). So while it’s hardly written in stone, it’s a possibility. It’s also probable that his psychotic episodes, which included hallucinations, allowed him the ability to capture these things naturally.

eupraxsophy:

Some scientists suspect that Vincent van Gogh was autistic, and this painting, Starry Night, is one reason. The swirling and stormy skies you see here (as well as in his other paintings) seem to fit the precise mathematical formula for turbulence known as the Kolmogorov scaling - which was devised 50 years after the painter’s death.

Autistic individuals are known to naturally grasp such concepts in lieu of verbal and social interactions (which van Gogh was known for lacking). So while it’s hardly written in stone, it’s a possibility. It’s also probable that his psychotic episodes, which included hallucinations, allowed him the ability to capture these things naturally.

lensblr-network
lensblr-network:

New York City - Tribute in Light - World Trade Center—-Sometimes it’s just the waythe light catches the eye;and how it pours itselfup to the skywatering the starsand universewith dreamsand hope,every speckof lightwrappedin memoryand remembrance.—-With love to New York City on a day of healing.——View: My photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.
by Vivienne Gucwa  (nythroughthelens.com)

lensblr-network:

New York City - Tribute in Light - World Trade Center

—-

Sometimes it’s just the way

the light catches the eye;

and how it pours itself

up to the sky

watering the stars

and universe

with dreams

and hope,

every speck

of light

wrapped

in memory

and remembrance.

—-

With love to New York City on a day of healing.

——

View: My photography portfolio, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.