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inspiringpieces:

Photography: Alex MacLean captures the patterns of civilisation from planes

Alex has been leaning out of plane windows to capture his shots ever since being awarded his pilot’s license in the 1970s, and he hopes that his photographs will encourage viewers to consider the impact of pollution and resource extraction on the environment. He explains: “Through sort of abstract and engaging patterns, those things will draw people into it to hopefully think about these issues. It really is about combining art and information. Some of it is sort of subliminal – you can’t quite put your finger on it but it sort of draws you in and engages you.”

via[it’s nice that], All images © Alex MacLean

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theoccasionaloddcrop
theoccasionaloddcrop:

'Are you leaving?'
Mateo and Palmetto, Arts District, Los Angeles; April 19, 2014
Unfortunately for him, they were not leaving. They had just parked, so he’d have to find another spot.
A few minutes later, as I was taking more photos of these old bricks, somebody asked me, “Why is everybody taking photos of this building?” I said I just thought it was a cool old building, and that since a lot of film crews work in the Arts District, maybe some of the photographers were location scouts.What I didn’t say, because I couldn’t find the right words, was that the old building made for interesting contrasts with the new people passing by, sometimes in shiny, red cars.

theoccasionaloddcrop:

'Are you leaving?'

Mateo and Palmetto, Arts District, Los Angeles; April 19, 2014

Unfortunately for him, they were not leaving. They had just parked, so he’d have to find another spot.

A few minutes later, as I was taking more photos of these old bricks, somebody asked me, “Why is everybody taking photos of this building?” I said I just thought it was a cool old building, and that since a lot of film crews work in the Arts District, maybe some of the photographers were location scouts.

What I didn’t say, because I couldn’t find the right words, was that the old building made for interesting contrasts with the new people passing by, sometimes in shiny, red cars.

joesnyc
davidsimonton:

"Sometimes working with the camera, somebody does something that’s just beyond belief. Garry Winogrand takes pictures of things that in your wildest dreams you wouldn’t think could exist in the world. There’s a picture of a cow’s tongue in a cowboy’s hat that becomes a beautiful thing; it looks like a piece of architecture. In your wildest dreams you couldn’t come with that and that’s just because he was aware that it might be possible. He was there when it happened and his head worked that way.”
—Lee Friedlander, from “Interview with Lee Friedlander,” Viewing Olmstead (1996)
(Photo: Garry Winogrand, Texas State Fair, Dallas, 1964)

davidsimonton:

"Sometimes working with the camera, somebody does something that’s just beyond belief. Garry Winogrand takes pictures of things that in your wildest dreams you wouldn’t think could exist in the world. There’s a picture of a cow’s tongue in a cowboy’s hat that becomes a beautiful thing; it looks like a piece of architecture. In your wildest dreams you couldn’t come with that and that’s just because he was aware that it might be possible. He was there when it happened and his head worked that way.”

Lee Friedlander, from “Interview with Lee Friedlander,” Viewing Olmstead (1996)

(Photo: Garry Winogrand, Texas State Fair, Dallas, 1964)